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Cashing In on Fear and Anger

07/21/2005

An abortion advocacy group uses the Supreme Court nomination as a fundraiser.

"Thousands of women will die if President Bush's nominee to the Supreme Court is confirmed!"

That's the response of many left-wing special interest groups and their voices in Congress upon learning that the president has kept his word in nominating a conservative judge to the highest court in the land.

My message to them--and everyone involved in political debate--is this: Make love, not war! (Don't misunderstand -- I use the term "love," often improperly used to refer to sexual acts, in its true context: unselfish care for others.)

In an interview with the Associated Press prior to Judge Roberts nomination, California Sen. Barbara Boxer was asked what kind of impact on abortion a pro-life judicial pick would have.

"It means a minimum of 5,000 women a year will die," she said.

Boxer later clarified her view. "I personally believe it's higher than that, given the fact that these were back-alley, and a lot of them done in unsanitary situations."

NARAL Pro-Choice America, a leading abortion advocacy group, has already proclaimed, "President Bush has nominated anti-choice activist John Roberts to fill swing vote Sandra Day O'Connor's seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. If Roberts is confirmed to a lifetime appointment, there is little doubt that he will work to overturn Roe v Wade ... Pro-choice Americans will not stand by while Bush tries to take our rights away."

The National Organization for Women (NOW) posted on their website: "John G. Roberts has continually supported and promoted an anti-woman, anti-civil rights, and anti-worker agenda."

According to Planned Parenthood, the nomination of Roberts "raises serious questions and grave concerns for women's health and safety." 

MoveOn.org called Judge Roberts' views "fringe and extreme."

"The stakes could not be higher," ACLU Executive Director Anthony D. Romero declared.

Indeed, the stakes are high. Millions of dollars high.

The left-wing activists' responses are canned. They were prepared before Bush's announcement with a fill-in-the-blank left for the nominee's name. The fear machine took a little longer to get rolling when the surprise nomination was announced, since Roberts actually has a much more mainstream record than the other candidates whose names had been circulating But, given the stakes, the machine had no choice but to move on as planned. 

Abortion advocates' battle cry is often: "Don't tell me what I can do with my body!" Well, your body is not the only issue.

Even Boxer's numbers are patently false. In 1930, abortion was listed as the official cause of death for almost 2,700 women. In 1940, after the introduction of penicillin, that number declined to less than 1,700. By 1950, the number fell dramatically to 316. In 1965, the official count of abortion-related deaths had fallen to 193.

Granted, abortion was illegal and, logically, underreported before 1973. But in the five years after Roe vs. Wade, more than 4.8 million abortions were recorded by the National Center for Health Statistics, with 25 maternal deaths occurring from illegal abortions and 92 occurring from legal abortions! Plus, the presumed overturning of Roe vs. Wade, which Judge Roberts has never promised, would have to be followed by several other reversals and then be outlawed by every state in the union.

The frenzy over someone that the Washington Post (a newspaper frequently accused of being a part of the so-called "liberal media") calls "a man of substance and seriousness... a conservative, but never an ideological crusader" can only be explained by one thing.

Fundraising.

Follow the money. Every supposition, exaggeration, and outright lie exists to motivate Americans to empty their bank accounts because they are fed up, ticked off or frightened. Fear and anger are easy sells. Asking in anger and fundraising in fear amount to political gold digging and the liberal advocacy groups have their tin pans ready.

It does not matter to a single-issue mindset whether a person upholds constitutional principles. All that matters is whether the candidate has a track record proving he or she will support a special interest position. Money can be raised as emotional flames are fanned if they strike while the heart is hot!

I've also seen it on the other side of the political spectrum and refused to associate with it. It doesn't matter whether the cause is liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican. When groups bang the drums to fill their war chests, they serve nobody but themselves. It is the same mindset that gives rise to mob rule. If uncontrolled emotion reigns, reason fails.

Certainly, it is healthy to engage in political debate -- and coordinated efforts make communication more efficient -- but the motivation must represent the belief in a truly worthy cause, concern for others and the love of our country. Funds should be raised and given because love has inspired concern for the "general welfare" of all... especially the weak, the helpless and the innocent. Otherwise, the results can only be harmful.

Love is the most lasting and powerful force in the world. Americans must allow reason to reign in the debate of social and political issues. Activists and advocates need to examine their methods and make sure their motives are rooted in love, not war.



Author: James Robison

Word Count: 863

About the author: James Robison is the founder and president of LIFE Outreach International, an international humanitarian aid ministry; host of the television program, Life Today; and author of The Absolutes.

Media Contact: Randy Robison, randy.robison at loi.org

Photo available upon request. Reprint rights granted with attribution for complete, unedited article. Revisions allowed only with approval.