We Appreciate You...Do You Appreciate U.S.?

03/30/2006

Grateful immigrant or troublemaker?

I'm glad I live in a country so free that masses of young people can assemble and march to protest pending legislation, even if they fail to understand the law or its purpose. I'm glad that hundreds of thousands of citizens and non-citizens can openly express their opinions, regardless of how ill-informed and illogical they may be. However, I am also disturbed by the words and actions suggesting that laws do not matter, respect for a sovereign nation is unimportant, and the rights and opportunities of foreigners supersede those of Americans.

I acknowledge and appreciate most immigrants' diligent work ethic, commitment to family, evident skills, and willingness to perform most any job. However, I am appalled that some blatantly break our laws, encourage others to do the same, and show so little regard for the place they consider their land of opportunity.

The protests in many major U.S. cities over the last week provided the perfect chance for the INS to enforce the existing immigration law. They could have blocked the streets and contained the masses, checked ID's and other paperwork, and immediately deported every illegal alien. Undoubtedly, this would have stopped much of the nonsense.

I was born and raised in Texas. We are proud of our rich Hispanic heritage. Most Americans of Hispanic descent that I know greatly resent any disregard of our laws and the ever-increasing burden that has been placed on our citizens. Those who did legally immigrate to this country for the abundance of opportunity that exists find themselves doubly offended -- they have to bear the burden of illegal aliens while being unfairly grouped with those same lawbreakers.

Something has to change.

I believe it is high-time we improve the protection of our borders, both north and south, while diligently enforcing our current laws. If we don't respect our laws and prove their value by enforcing them, we should not be surprised when others show no respect. I believe that every illegal alien in our country (however well-intentioned) should immediately go back to their country of origin and seek re-entry by following our guidelines and procedures. Those with children or a spouse in the country legally need special consideration to expedite their transition first to legal-worker status, and then to citizenship.

Every worker holding a job in the States should obtain a written statement from his or her employer confirming the need for his or her skill. This notarized paper should be a part of the justification for a worker's permit and the eventual process of citizenship, if so desired. Serious workers and employers should be excited about participating in this program. Employers who refuse to obey should be penalized severely.

It's time to get serious demanding respect, earning and deserving respect, and, most of all, giving it. This is no time for expressions of racism from any group. This is simply law enforcement in an orderly society.

America is a nation of immigrants. We need them and they need us! We appreciate the positive characteristics of those who come here seeking unparalleled opportunity. We respect those who represent the best of the rest of the world who come here to live and work in freedom and liberty. It's time that they began to respect and appreciate "US".



Author: James Robison

Word Count: 543

About the author: James Robison is the founder and president of LIFE Outreach International, an international humanitarian aid ministry; host of the television program, Life Today; and author of The Absolutes.

Media Contact: Randy Robison, editor at jamesrobison.net

Photo available upon request. Reprint rights granted with attribution for complete, unedited article. Revisions allowed only with approval.

 

 

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